Kuşadası, Turkey 2015

Kusadasi is one of Turkey’s most popular holiday resorts, situated on the west coast of Turkey. It is easy to do day trips from Kusadasi to important historical sites including Ephesus, Temple of Artemis, Goddess Artemis, House of Virgin Mary, Seven Sleepers, Didyma, Priene, Miletos.     A beach town with typical Mediterranean climate (hot summers and mild winters), it’s not hard to figure out why Kusadasi is one of the most popular destinations for Northern Europeans.       With 24 hours after arriving Kusadasi, I already had the pleasure to taste two traditional Turkish meals.  Menemen is a traditional Turkish dish which includes eggs, onion, tomato, green peppers, and spices such as ground black pepper, ground red pepper, salt and oregano. Lahmacun is a round, thin piece of dough topped with minced meat (mostly beef/lamb) and minced vegetables and herbs, then baked.      Lady’s Beach is certainly one of the nicer beaches I could walk to. As touristy as it is, I surely enjoyed taking pictures of children playing.


Today I made the smart decision of walking uphill. What a difference it made! Gone are all the touristy shops and you get a view of the actually town/ village. While spotting a few locals walking home with their grocery, I also saw a rooster, a house and a random Ferris wheel.


I really enjoyed watching this mother watching her child play. There is just something moving and beautiful about the way she could enjoy the beach while being comfortable in her traditional clothing.

 

Kadayıflı Muhallebi Tarifi

I am in Turkey during Ramadan season and I had the honour to join a traditional Turkish family for Itfar.

Ramadan is the ninth month of the Islamic calendar. It is observed by Muslims worldwide as a month of fasting to commemorate the first revelation of the Quran to Muhammad according to Islamic belief.

Iftar is the evening meal when Muslims end their daily Ramadan fast at sunset. Iftar is often done as a community, with people gathering to break their fast together.

My Iftar with a traditional Turkish family starts with a tomato based soup served with shredded cheese; followed by traditional Turkish Raviolis/dumplings served with yogurt; and grilled vegetables served as the main sharing dish.

  
 

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